Street Projects

Through our PROGRAMS of Planning, Implementation and Maintenance, we plan to undertake many street-related projects.

Streets are the communal public rights of way that bind communities together. Attractive healthy streetscapes foster healthy communities and vice-versa. In many parts of the Industrial District, the streets, for a variety of reasons are unattractive and unhealthful (some times scandalously so).

Mosaic decorated trash can in Oakland California, as read about here.

Mosaic decorated trash can in Oakland California

Currently there are large portions in the Industrial District not covered by a Business  Improvement  District - these areas are where additional trash cans are most needed. This will require a partnership with the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation.

This pic, taken in late 2012 show the continuing struggle that exists in many parts of the indurtrial district of downtown Los Angeles. This particual street- San Julian St. has proven the most challenging to keep clean.
Taken in late 2012 this shot shows the unhealthful street conditions that exist in  many parts of the Industrial District of downtown Los Angeles. This particular street, San Julian, has proven the most challenging to keep clean

Given the volume of trash generated in the area (specifically in Skid Row), the BigBelly Solar Trash Compactor device shown in the video below would be an ideal addition. IDG plans to coordinate the installation of several of these for the Industrial District of downtown Los Angeles. Again, this will require partnering with the Los Angeles Bureau of Sanitation and area Business Improvement Districts as needed.

IDG views these efforts as preliminary steps in upgrading the quality of life on the streets which will eventually include shade trees, public art, and attractive street furniture. In downtown LA's Industrial District much of the street level infrastructure is lacking especially where residential populations, housed and homeless, are concentrated.

This bench decorated here is from The Bench Art Project in Lincolin Nebraskais which raises awareness about human trafficking. Click here to learn more.
This bench is from "The Bench Art Project" in Lincoln Nebraska, which raises awareness about human trafficking. IDG would like to work with local artists to collaborate on street furniture like this
This bench is from the Architect Caesar Pelli and Associates in Japan. They say this design, " It expands possibilities of art". IDG will be looking for unique ways to incorporate art with seating options for the Industrial district of downtown Los Angeles, much like is shown here.
These benches in Japan were designed by Architect Caesar Pelli and Associates. IDG will be looking for unique ways to incorporate art and seating options for the Industrial District of downtown Los Angeles
Combining public seating and tree protection, the Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership in New York has a great idea here and one IDG will be looking at emulating.
Combining public seating and tree protection, the Myrtle Avenue Brooklyn Partnership of New York has set an example worthy of emulating

We intend to support and commission public art for downtown Los Angeles' industrial spaces. The pictures below are merely ideas from which we are taking inspiration.

According to Linda Slodki of the Mt. Airy Art Garage, the arts are a highly cost-effective way of driving economic revitalization in urban areas. However, the arts not only spur economic development but also ”shape our consciousness, create a collective attitude, inspire, remake behavior, and reduce stress.”

Dan Rosenfeld, in an article from The Atlantic Cities entitled "The Financial Case for Public Art" (May 28, 2012) states that "The intangible benefits of public art—aesthetic beauty, cultural interpretation, education, inspiration, and general improvement of the urban environment—are well-known. But because these are considered 'soft' benefits, they are sometimes dismissed as a low priority, especially during challenging economic times. However, experiences in Los Angeles show that public art can be a source of publicity and cash income, as well as beauty."

Emeryville artist Vickie Jo Sowell installed a this piece at the Fire Station #2, located at 6303 Hollis Street in Emeryville, CA
Visible from lower Manhattan, artist Tom Fruin‘s “Watertower” makes use of salvaged materials
A public art installation in South Korea made from reused doors by artist Choi Jeong-Hwa.
A public art installation in South Korea made from reused doors by artist Choi Jeong-Hwa
This "painted intersection" is in Seattle Washington. This idea originated from Oregon’s City Repair. Generally sanctioned in quieter residential areas, it remains unclear if this idea could work in the Los Angeles' industrial space- perhaps off the beaten path?
This "painted intersection" is in Seattle Washington. This idea originated from Oregon’s City Repair
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Greening the industrial spaces between downtown’s high-rises and the LA River.


California Releaf